Sometimes theres a need to use ssh with the password as a command line parameter, I know keys do exist and may be used for a “passwordless” login, I know you may use expect to create a script to type the password for you. But if you just want a plain simple tool to do it you may use plink.

Usually plink isn’t available in the distro (at least with SuSE and Fedora) so you may need to download it’s source and compile it.

Get it from http://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/latest/putty-0.60.tar.gz

Untar it with: tar -zxvf

Sometimes theres a need to use ssh with the password as a command line parameter, I know keys do exist and may be used for a “passwordless” login, I know you may use expect to create a script to type the password for you. But if you just want a plain simple tool to do it you may use plink.

Usually plink isn’t available in the distro (at least with SuSE and Fedora) so you may need to download it’s source and compile it.

Get it from http://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/latest/putty-0.60.tar.gz and follow the commands:

tar -zxvf putty-0.60.tar.gz

cd putty-0.60/unix

./configure ; make ; sudo make install

and your done compiling.

Now lets talk about using plink, you may use plink as a regular ssh client, something like; plink pedro@192.168.1.1 and it will behave as your regular ssh client. Now try plink user@server -pw your_password and “voilá” you logged in. For safety issues type “history -c” (this will cleanup your history).

If you want, and this is the main use of plink, automate and ssh script to run in batch mode as for instance in a cron script your may use something like (lets suppose you have a text file called login_data.txt, with 2 entrances by line separated by spaces, the first entrance will be the host and the second the password) and you want to login with root and execute the command poweroff:

#!/bin/bash

cat  login_data.txt | while read LINE ; do

CLEANED=`echo $LINE | tr -s ” ” LINE ; # this will clean the extra spaces

HOST=`echo $CLEANED |  cut -d ” ” -f 1`;  this will extract the host

PASSWD=`echo $CLEANED|  cut -d ” ” -f 2`; this will extract the passwd

plink root@$HOST -pw $PASSWD shutdown ;

done

Just be very careful with permissions on files that have clear text passwords, ideally they shouldn’t exist but sometimes every sysadmin as such needs.

If you want you may check further info on plink on putty web site or by just typing plink on the command line.

The above scrip only works if you had already logged in at least one time (you still need to accept the ssh server key) if you totally want to automate it you may use expect (I’m hopping to write about it sometime soon).

Cheers and see you next time